#chassid

If you haven't tasted P'tcha

If you haven't tasted P'tcha/Galareta (we Ashkenazim have a couple of names for this dish) you haven't experienced a true Chassidish Shabbos meal. This dish is something newbies have a hard time with. It kind of has that weird jelly texture that wiggles around in your mouth with a strong garlic smell. I don't know why I'm telling you this, I do want you to try it. (foot in mouth emoji) I think it's an acquired taste, but once you try it you can't really have a Shabbos meal without it. What I love about making these #traditionalchassidishfood posts is that I get to learn the history and reasons why we eat certain foods. Not that I actually need one, I do eat well without it, but it definitely adds a whole new perspective. No, we Chassidim don't do things just because, okay, maybe sometimes, but generally we have something backing it up. Many of the traditional foods have become a Jewish accepted staple like the matzo ball chicken soup, Challah, latkas, etc. P'tcha is a dish that has its fans dwindling, but it's more than just a dish it carries a story of struggle and resourcefulness. If we don't continue making it and passing it on to the next generation it will be gone. We Chassidim definitely know how to hold on to this old recipes. Like many other traditional dishes we have discussed in previous posts, due to poverty, Jews in the past made use of every part of the animal in their cooking. P'tcha is made of calf knee bones or chicken feet, cooked like a soup and when it cools it turns into a gelatin texture. Next time you're at a Kiddush or Shabbos meal and you see the P'tcha, try it, or maybe you'll even make it. Let us know how you liked it! The recipe from @cookkosher is in comments. #ptcha #galareta #jewishtradition #jewishfood #kosherfood #kosher #shabbos #shabbat #jewish #chassidim #chassid #shabbatshalom #traditionalchassidishfood


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"And you shall bind them for a sign upon your hand, and they shall be for ornaments between your eyes."


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Remnants of the Sefer Torah be

Remnants of the Sefer Torah being checked in our office today... not pictured: the car seat it was delivered in!


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Ben Zoma would say: Who is wis

Ben Zoma would say: Who is wise? One who learns from every man.


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Can you smell it from there?

Can you smell it from there? 🎨


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С 15 по 20 ноября в

С 15 по 20 ноября в Нью-Йорке пройдет ежегодный съезд посланников Любавического Ребе.✡ Тысячи хасидов со всего мира будут учиться, общаться, делиться опытом друг с другом. А главное - заряжаться энергией, которую они принесут в свои еврейские общины.🎇 Мы нашли на фотографиях знакомые лица, а вы?😊 ~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~ #jewish #ny #newyork #chassid #shluchim #kinus #rebe #новости #съезд #ньюйорк #ребе #yahad


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It's dark at night, but the st

It's dark at night, but the street lights illuminate the roads so we can see the path and stay on track. There is much darkness in the world, but nothing is stopping me or you from illuminating the world around us to keep ourselves and others on track; nor is anything stopping us from igniting the souls around us so they can make the world even brighter by illuminate places that we ourselves can't reach. The darkness is real but so is the light. Be a lamp 💡💡💡 Be a lamplighter 🔥🔥🔥


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We Chassidim have a couple of

We Chassidim have a couple of unique Customs, and by a couple, I should really say many. Previously, when we discussed why Chassidim go to a rebbe for Yom Tov, (to find that post just search the #traditionsexplained hashtag) I mentioned that in a Chassidish community the Rebbe is the shepherd of his flock in the most literal sense and everything is centered around the Rebbe's guidance and teachings. In order for the Chassidim to have contact with their Rebbe on a more frequent basis, the Chassidim developed the practice of the Tish. The word Tish in Yiddish means a table. When going to a Rebbe's Tish you are actually joining the Rebbe's table and participating in the meal physically and symbolically. As mentioned, the Rebbe isn't only our spiritual guidance, we go to him to learn about all the mundane daily tasks hence the Tisch. One of the ways we participate at the Tish is by eating shirayim, literal meaning leftovers, that has been passed around for the Chassidim to eat. It is believed that those who eat shirayim from the Rebbe will merit to Yiras Shomayim (awe of heaven) and many other blessings. There are many Chassidish tales of miraculous healing, blessing of wealth or piety after receiving shirayim from a Rebbe. Besides for the meal portion of the tish (I know we Chassidim cover the food topic thoroughly) the actual Tish includes singing, dancing and Dvar Torah. If you want to have a true Chassdish experience, start at a Rebbe's Tish. #tish #rebbe #jewishtraditions #jewishtradition #jewishlife #orthodoxjew #chassidim #chassid #jewish #kosher #rabbi #travelingchassidim


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🚨 what went wrong here?

🚨 what went wrong here?


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Tag someone that looks like th

Tag someone that looks like this man. Maybe we will find him 🕵🏽#branding #chocolatte #logo #hipster #chassid #internetcaffe


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Why do chassidim have curly lo

Why do chassidim have curly long payos (sidelocks)? First, in contrary to the common misconception, having payos is not just a chassidish thing, it's a Jewish thing. The Torah states "Do not cut the hair on the corners (payos) of your head" This is one of the rare "do not"s in the Torah that only applies to men. The Talmud and commentaries explain that hair may not be completely removed from the sideburn area, at least from the cheekbone and up around the ear. Payos come in all different shapes, sizes and lengths. Although one is permitted to trim the peyos, some, especially in certain chassidish circles, have the minhag (custom) of not cutting their peyos. One of the sources for this minhag is a directive that the chassidic master Rabbi Meir of Premishlan gave to Rabbi Sholom Mordechai ha-Kohen Schwadron (Maharsham) when he was a young boy: that he should never cut his peyos, and would thereby merit long life. In addition Hashem has stated we shouldn't cut the hair on the corners of our heads. Chassidim always do more then the actual commandment. Hashem said he wants us to do and we will do more then he asked and won't cut them at all. However, it is not clear that this instruction from Rabbi Meir Premishlan was ever meant to be anything more than a personal directive. Additionally, it is known that for Kabbalistic reasons, Rabbi Yitzchak Luria (Arizal) would make sure to trim his peyos with scissors so that the hairs of the peyos not mix with those of the beard, since they correspond to different mystical attributes. In light of this, many, including Chabad, have the custom specifically to trim the peyos. There are multiple other minhagim regarding peyos: tucking them behind the ears, wrapping them around the ears (like lots of Belz chassidim do) or twirling them into long ringlets. Some of these minhagim are based on mystical teachings, while others are based more on community norms. But what is important to bear in mind is that all these different customs go beyond the basic requirement of peyos. #payos #payot #traditionsexplained #jewishtradition #jewishlife #orthodoxjew #chassidim #chassid #chassidicstyles #jewish #kosher #rabbi #travelingchassidim


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